REALLY Stuck For Blogging Ideas? Here’s Some Sanity Savers

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As you may know, we’ve made blogging for filmmakers a focus of our blog content this month, and SURPRISE! here’s a bonus entry to round out the month.

When it comes to growing your audience for your filmmaking, blogging is one of those things that is nice to have but isn’t essential. That being said, if you’re keen to add regular blogging to your film publicity arsenal, there can be times when you might be stuck for ideas. Eeek! I’ve been there! If you’re keen to do a blog post (or have a few up your sleeve for later), but find that suddenly the creative synapses are firing, here’s a few ideas to help get things revved up again. They’re based on my very own experiences of having a complete and utter ‘brain fart’ (for want of a better term):

Do a content digest: ever come across content on the web that you think everyone should see? No, not just cats in suits. Or maybe that’s just me….! Perhaps you find an inspiring TED talk about creativity, a SXSW chat with a filmmaker, or a book on screenwriting that rocked your socks off. These can be repurposed into a content digest blog post. I have done this several times on here, mostly because I had found books, videos apps and filmmaking tools that were too good not to share. In fact, one of the most visited and shared posts on this blog was The Indie Filmmaker’s PR and Digital Marketing Toolkit

Make a list: it sounds like a no-brainer, but how many times do we have ideas swirling in our brains like some delicious creative soup but we don’t write them down? Take some time, make a list, a mind map, a diagram…whatever your chosen recording method is. Get those potential blog post ideas down on paper and keep them somewhere you can refer to them for later. Another option if you’re not going to be doing a blog post updating people on your film’s progress, etc, is to have a jar on your desk where you’ve written blog post ideas on slips of paper and pick one.

Elaborate on past posts: perhaps you’ve touched briefly on a topic in a previous post and think it would make a really excellent separate post. Or perhaps you want to revisit an earlier post and elaborate further (or do an update). Either way, there can be some hidden gems in previous posts that can be teased out, repurposed or elaborated on in a fresh and exciting way in a new post.

Don’t sweat it: if you’re really, truly stuck…don’t sweat it! Walk away, do something completely different, or leave it for another day. Blogging shouldn’t be a chore or something you feel tied to. If you’re not feeling it, just leave it. And don’t feel obliged to write about the things you think people want to hear about, either. If it’s not something you’re passionate about sharing, don’t force it. I look at it like redecorating your living room. You redecorate your living room in the way you want to redecorate it, in a way that reflects you, your lifestyle and your family. You don’t look at the redecorating process and go: “gosh, I should have a red feature wall with my awards on it, because that’s what Cindy likes. If I don’t have that red feature wall, Cindy won’t want to come to our housewarming.” That redecorating analogy was brought to you due to the fact I’ve been binge watching Queer Eye on Netflix, but it’s true! There are way too many other things in life that cause pressure and stress, and blogging shouldn’t be one of them.

Happy filmmaking, and happy blogging! If you’ve enjoyed this month’s spotlight on blogging for filmmakers, we’ve got a treat in store for March. March is going to be a spotlight on crowdfunding, with loads of hints, tips and real world advice on how to make the most of crowdfunding your film.

Answering Questions About Blogging For Filmmakers

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This month we’ve been looking at how blogging can be another tool to assist you in growing your audience for your filmmaking, and gave you some ideas to help get you started. We end our focus on blogging this month by answering common questions about blogging for filmmakers. Hopefully our spotlight on blogging this month has, at the very least, given you another tool to consider when building your audience and promoting your films. Time to answer some common questions about blogging so you can be inspired to give it a try if you haven’t already!

Q: How often should I post? It depends on whether or not blogging is a big part of your marketing strategy for your filmmaking or a particular film you’re working on. You also need to take into account how busy you are at any given time- for instance, if you’re currently in principal photography chances are unless you have a team member dedicated to blogging on your behalf you’re not going to have a lot of time or energy to devote to such a rigorous posting schedule. Experts say you should post once or twice per week, but you don’t have to adhere to that particular rule, especially if you are posting regularly via social media.

You also don’t want to feel constrained by an obligation to post once or twice a week- you’re a creative person, and blogging shouldn’t feel like a chore. Post as often or as little as you like, but make sure you don’t have your blog going completely dead. Want to blog infrequently but still have a desire to create blog content about filmmaking or your film? See if there are indie film blogs and websites that would be interested in having you as a guest blogger.

Q: Where should I host my blog? The beauty of blogging is that there are hosting options a plenty! Depending on your website platform you may have the option to integrate a blog into that website (as we have). You may choose to operate a stand-alone blog in conjunction with your website. Alternatively, you may choose to have an account on a stand-alone publishing platform like Medium. It’s a good idea to weigh up your options before committing to something you may not end up using in the long-term.

The benefit of having your blog on your website is that it will help to drive more people to your website- they’ll come for the blog post and hopefully stay to look at your website.

Q: Should I share my blog posts on my social media channels? Absolutely! Blogging provides even more rich, shareable content to promote via social media. Some blogging platforms will have an integrated setting which allows you to share immediately to your social media channels when you publish, which takes the stress out of remembering to share your blog link.

Q: Help! I’m really stuck for content ideas! Have you tried turning it off and on again? Kidding!!! Check out our blog post about content ideas HERE. Currently filming or in post-production? You might want to see if one of your cast or crew would like to contribute a blog post, talking about the process. Perhaps your DoP wants to share some hints and tips, or one of your makeup SFX artists wants to share their career insights and give a sneak peek into their process. Blogging doesn’t have to be a solo effort.

Hopefully our spotlight on blogging in February has been food for thought. If you have a filmmaking blog (or you start one after reading our features on blogging), we’d love to know! Happy blogging and happy filmmaking!

 

Blogging For Filmmakers: Swipe These Ideas For Blog Content!

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This month, we’re focusing on blogging for filmmakers and how you can grow your audience and awareness for your filmmaking with a blog. The first post in the series covered some of the advantages of blogging, and now we’re diving deeper and looking at the type of content you can generate.

When it comes to blog content as a filmmaker, the sky is the limit! Here’s a few broad ideas to get you started if you’re completely new to blogging but want to start:

Updates on your film: one of the easiest ways to generate blog content is by providing filmmaking updates. Got a mailing list? You can cross-purpose your updates on both. Talk about your successes, let people in on great on-set anecdotes and happenings, and think about embedding some behind the scenes video or images.

Your filmmaking process: some filmmakers truly enjoy talking about the filmmaking process (both technical and creative), and some don’t. If you’re in the former category you might want to approach this with great gusto. Who and what inspires you and informs your creative process? If you chose to film on film instead of digitally, what was the reason? What challenges have you faced in your career? There are endless variations on this theme and so many more subjects that are great for blog posts.

Hot topics in filmmaking: there’s so many things happening in the film industry at any given day, whether it’s a studio merger, changes in the streaming and VOD landscape or other industry buzz there’s always something to write about. This is a great option if you’re particularly passionate about a hot topic. A word of caution from a publicity point-of-view: it’s best not to go off on a rant!

Guest blogging: want to write occasionally, but don’t have the time to commit to regular blogging? Guest blogging might be the idea for you. Providing blog content on another blog is also a great way to bring further awareness to your film and filmmaking. For instance, I recently guest blogged on We Make Movies on Weekends, talking about how movie PR works.

Sharing your filmmaking knowledge: this is another popular topic. Share filmmaking hints and tips, things you’ve learned in your filmmaking career, and offer advice. Share the wealth of knowledge you’ve gained through your filmmaking. This is something I do often on the Sprites blog, partly as another way of showing that I don’t just talk the talk when it comes to publicity of indie films, I also walk the walk and can show you ways of growing your audience and securing media (just like with this post).

In the next post on blogging for filmmakers, we’ll look at what to do when you want to blog…but you’re really stuck! I’ve got a few techniques to help the ideas flow.