How I Built Film Sprites PR

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If you want to find out how to make triple digits in a year….this is not the right post for you.

Similarly, if you’re looking for juicy stories about red carpets and celebrity encounters…this is also not the right post for you.

So, why should I bother reading?, you might say. Well, if you want to gain some insight on chasing your dreams, being of service to a community you’re passionate about, and how to thrive (and not just survive) after disaster and loss…this is definitely for you. If you got up this morning, feeling hopeless about a cherished dream and stumbled across this post, then perhaps this is for you. In fact, when I first started I wish I had someone who could give me insight into their path and perhaps inspire me to pursue my dreams further. Maybe I can do that for you.

Auspicious beginnings

Film has been my great love for as long as I can remember. When I was very young, I recall my first trip to the cinema with my Mum to see Labyrinth on the big screen. I remember the colour and pattern of the cinema complex’s carpet, the other film posters on the walls (films like Blind Date and Masters of the Universe were playing), the smell of popcorn, Fizzy Fruits and Jaffas…and the magic on the screen. Growing up, I could remember every film I went to with friends, every film I saw at slumber parties and the classic films that made a huge impression on me. It was an illicit viewing of Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting as a teenager that really cemented my passion for films, however. I began to seek out films that went above and beyond the traditional blockbuster fare, immersing myself in Kubrick, Bergman, and following Quentin Tarantino’s then-blossoming career. There had been the odd thought about working in the film industry when I was older…but I dismissed it as easily as you’d flick a fly away from your face. People I knew didn’t work in the film industry. They picked a trade or got a Bachelor’s, they went to nursing school or teacher’s college. I had considered working in PR, however- I had been writing and submitting manuscripts to publishers from the age of 11 (yes really!), and was a freelance journalist at the age of 17 while still in school. I wrote articles for the Christchurch Press’s now defunct youth interests page.

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One of my articles for the Christchurch Press’s YOUth page (now defunct)

Unfortunately, a very severe bout of glandular fever with complications meant that by the time I left school I didn’t have the energy to pursue a definite career path straight away, and when I did I chose teaching. I should have known that that wasn’t the right path for me, because every Thursday when I didn’t have any classes or lectures in the afternoons I would sneak away and watch a film at the local cinema. I know a lot of people don’t like the idea of going to the movies alone, but I loved it. You block the rest of the world out. You become one with the screen. Nothing else matters.

Crisis Point

I didn’t finish my teaching degree, and ended up aimlessly working through my 20s in various roles, including retail and administration. But 2011 would dramatically change everything. The old would be swept away whether I liked it or not. I didn’t think a natural disaster could have such a dramatic impact on my life…but it did.

Christchurch Earthquake Building

We’d had an earthquake in September of 2010 and while it was large in magnitude, Christchurch managed to try and get back to normal as soon as possible. We had a huge amount of aftershocks, something which is unnerving and deeply unsettling, but we didn’t think it could get any worse than that. February 22, 2011 proved us wrong.

I was one of the fortunate ones- my friends and family all came out unscathed, and while we had to boil water that came to us from milk tankers for a week or so, we had power. My flat was structurally sound, my parents were fine and we even celebrated my partner’s birthday 5 days after the quake with a small chocolate mud cake we managed to source from a local supermarket. But I didn’t come out completely unscathed. I was a wreck. I lost hope. I grieved for the people who had lost their lives…and I grieved for the city I had grown up in. Things got very, very dark.

The Muses to the Rescue

It’s a very strange feeling to grow up in a place that seems to change gradually over time and then have everything seemingly change overnight. For months after the quake I struggled seeing landmarks and places I’d known by heart suddenly disappear. Huge swathes of land in the central city and in the suburb where I grew up suddenly became a blank canvas. You would have clusters of particularly violent aftershocks that would have you at your wit’s end. I stayed with a friend up north for a week and one day her dog bumped the chair I was sitting in and immediately my nervous system registered it as an aftershock. They thought it was hilarious. I didn’t. I stopped going to the cinema, which was a really bad sign for me. It wasn’t that I was afraid that a bad aftershock might happen….I just didn’t have the strength and energy.

But then a limited screening happened that tempted me out of my house and into the cinema….and something clicked. The muses of cinema poked and prodded at me, and I for the first time in what seemed like forever I felt like I was stirring from a slumber. I was so inspired that by the time I left the screening I couldn’t speak. I didn’t want to speak. It felt like such a sacred moment that words would feel dirty at that moment. I knew I had to make a change. I had waited too long to really, truly live my life and achieve my dreams. This was it- there was no turning back.

Thank You, Amanda Palmer

There’s a brand of cheese here in New Zealand whose tagline in their commercials is ‘Good Things Take Time’, and that’s exactly what happened with my career. I had gotten a Bachelor of Arts in my mid-twenties, but I pursued a Certificate in Public Relations and Business Communications as well. While I was studying, I began to network with filmmakers around the world and build up my social media network. I figured, hey- it’ll be easy getting a film job…right? Not quite. After asking for advice, a few closed doors and not really knowing where the heck I was going, something happened that I didn’t expect.

It was April 17, 2014. That morning, I had stumbled across Amanda Palmer’s TED talk on The Art of Asking. Another truth bomb, another flash of inspiration…but I didn’t do anything with that inspiration immediately. Prior to this, I think I expected the Universe to do the heavy lifting for me. I’d actually missed out on a really huge opportunity in 2013 but I was 2 weeks too early for it (my intuition kept telling me on the day I was due to fly to Wellington and it was snowing that I should re-schedule my flight for 2 weeks’ time, but did I listen? Noooo!). I went about my day, doing rather mundane things but a little voice inside me kept saying: “ASK.” Ask? Ask for what? Ask who? It then suddenly became clear to me- I have built up a reasonable following on Twitter, primarily within the film community…why don’t I just ask if they want publicity and digital marketing help? So I did.

At the end of the day I had my first 3 clients.

By the end of that weekend I had 6.

By the end of April I had 12.

And Film Sprites PR was born.

Of course, here’s the caveat: don’t do what I did! Or, if you do, make sure you have the things I didn’t have when I started; things like seed money, a clear brand with a clear message and a great website. I ended up having to cobble things together and pick up things I had no clue about, like SEO, because I didn’t have the money to outsource. I learned website design. I learned graphic design basics. I began to build up a fully fleshed-out and realised brand. Even though it was a messy start, I don’t regret that at all. It makes for a cute story, but also I look back at what I didn’t know then and compare it to what I know now and I’m proud of my progress. Film Sprites PR has assisted over 25 filmmakers in NZ, the US, UK, Canada and Australia with publicity, digital marketing and crowdfunding campaign assistance. Sprites has worked with filmmakers whose portfolios have included films that have starred the likes of Norman Reedus, David Carradine, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Claire Foy. Most importantly to me, Sprites has helped to connect filmmakers to their audiences and helped them create a strong brand around their filmmaking.

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Some of Film Sprites PR’s past and present clients

The Future….

Believe it or not, I never actually wanted to work for myself. It’s true! I had always thought about building up my skills and expertise and a strong portfolio and eventually take on a role with a distributor or studio. That’s still something I’m aiming for, and something I would like to happen in the future. But for now, I’m really excited about what’s happening and what the future holds, both for me and for the filmmakers I’m honoured to work with.

If there’s anything you can take away from my story, I hope it’s this: following your heart and honouring your truth are vital. There are so many things the world can take away from us physically, emotionally or mentally, but your truth is something that can never be denied within you. You don’t have to do something as dramatic as starting a business, but you can start your own personal revolution right now. Don’t wait.

 

 

 

Handy Crowdfunding Resources for Indie Filmmakers

Handy Crowdfunding Resources for Indie Filmmakers

I can say with complete sincerity that it’s been a complete blast bringing you our Crowdfunding for Filmmakers month! There’s been lots of great feedback and it’s been thoroughly enjoyable to bring to you hints, tips and advice on crowdfunding of your indie film or webseries. There have been people who have said: “well, what about my (insert non-film project here)?” No problem! All of the hints and tips we’ve provided here are easily adaptable to any campaign for any project- the reason for a filmmaking focus is, well, we work with filmmakers!

This post is going to be a little different from the previous crowdfunding posts, because I wanted to bring you a really useful toolbox of resources that can assist you with your crowdfunding, regardless of budget or size of project. Some of these resources are ones I personally use for the work we do at Film Sprites PR, some are really handy resources that will inspire and add to your crowdfunding resource and knowledge base. Plus, we’ve got a little freebie we’ve been hinting about via our social media as well! So, here’s some resources I hope you’ll find genuinely useful:

TED Talks and Other Must-Sees

I have previously talked about how Amanda Palmer’s TED Talk about ‘The Art of Asking‘ was vital in the creation of Film Sprites PR, and it really is powerful. It’s something I recommend every artist watches at least once before they think about undertaking a crowdfunding campaign. Why? It’s so hard to ask for anything in life because it can be such a vulnerable act, but when you remember the importance of human connection and of being seen it can put asking in a new light. If you’re really amped up after watching this, you can follow it up with Amanda’s Google talk as well. I also thoroughly recommend reading her book of the same name, because the sections about artists and crowdfunding that are interspersed throughout the book will give you insight on the process from an artistic perspective, something which is so very valuable.

Another talk (this time at TEDxJerseyCity), is John T. Trigonis’ talk ‘Crowdfunding Today, Tomorrow, Together‘. John knows his stuff, because he’s not only run his own successful crowdfunding campaigns for his films and graphic novels, he’s also a film strategist for IndieGoGo. I’ve said it many times and I’ll say it again- John knows his stuff. I also highly recommend the second edition of his book ‘Crowdfunding for Filmmakers‘. It’s an enjoyable read with lots of no-nonsense examples and advice, and it’s definitely well worth your time. It’s the one book I recommend to every filmmaker.

And if you’re super-keen, grab a cup of your favourite hot beverage and a notepad and pen and get immersed in Emily Best of Seed & Spark’s videos on crowdfunding for Film Courage.

Posts From Our Vault:

During this month we’ve given you a wealth of information about crowdfunding for filmmakers, but we have also posted blog posts about aspects of crowdfunding in the past as well! We give you ways to look after yourself during your crowdfunding campaign to avoid burnout, how to harness Twitter for your crowdfunding campaign, and how to maintain that ever-important connection with your contributors post-campaign.

Social Media Scheduling Tools:

While you should aim for around a 90/10 ratio for organic posts/automated posts, there are some great scheduling tools which can assist you in scheduling and posting across your social media platforms simultaneously instead of having to do it manually for each platform. Hootsuite is arguably the first platform which comes to mind, but I actually like Tweetdeck when it comes to automation and scheduling on Twitter also.

Design Software and Apps:

Confession: I love design apps, not just for their ability to assist me in designing things quickly and cleanly for social media, but because with many design apps they will help you to crop pictures to fit the proportions of various social media platforms. Images are exceptionally useful when it comes to promoting your crowdfunding campaign on social media and sharing things behind-the-scenes of your film, and design apps can really assist you, even if you have absolutely no clue about how to use design software like Photoshop. Here are the software/apps I particularly like:

  • Canva: I can honestly say that I use Canva almost every day in some capacity because it’s very easy-to-use. One benefit of Canva is that it will give you alignment guidelines so you can make sure everything is aligned and looking good. For every design size there are also templates available with different design mock-ups. The basic (and generously extensive) software is free to use and you don’t have to download it if you’re using it on a home computer.
  • Pixlr: here’s another one I use regularly, and have used often during crowdfunding campaigns and for social media posts. In fact, if you’ve seen social media posts for the 2018 Raindance crowdfunding campaign that we’ve been posting on our Twitter, Instagram and Facebook posts, you might have seen collages which show multiple images (like the picture below). These were created via Pixlr. Pixlr is useful for multi image collages, but it also has things like filters, special effects and photo editing which can be useful for touching up images you want to use. The Pixlr app is particularly useful for editing on the run!
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Image created in Pixlr to show films which had previous screened at Raindance Film Festival, to be posted on Twitter.

  • Another app I like is Promo Republic. One of the benefits of Promo Republic is that it gives you a calendar which shows you when international events are coming up (like awards ceremonies, holidays or quirky national days), and there are often templates to match. This can be useful if you’re looking for content to post which matches the theme or vibe of your film.

And now, as promised…we have a freebie for everyone! Click HERE to gain access to our booklet, Crowdfunding Hints and Tips for Filmmakers. It contains two of our most popular (and most useful!) posts about crowdfunding for filmmakers. There’s no catch- no purchase necessary, no opt-in, just click and download. Simple!

Film Sprites PR Crowdfunding Hints and Tips for Filmmakers

Hopefully this has been a really useful month of posts about crowdfunding for you. If you’d like to know more about what we do at Film Sprites PR in terms of publicity and digital marketing of independent films and webseries, you can find out more HERE. Alternately, get in touch with us! Use our contact page, or drop us an email at: filmspritespr[at]gmail[dot]com.

Prep for Crowdfunding Campaign Success With These Steps

Prep for Crowdfunding Success

This month on the blog we’re focusing on crowdfunding for filmmakers! If you haven’t checked out the first post in the series, you can read it here.

Believe it or not, Film Sprites PR has its foundations in crowdfunding campaign promotion. Before Sprites began, I had spent the past 2 years networking with indie filmmakers and unofficially helping out by spreading the word about their crowdfunding campaigns. At the time crowdfunding was very much in the early adopter phase. Then, when Sprites started taking on clients, there was a lot of interest from filmmakers who were crowdfunding or were looking to start a crowdfunding campaign. It’s certainly not something I learned about during my PR certification, I can tell you! As a result, Film Sprites PR has assisted many filmmakers around the world with their crowdfunding campaigns (and in some cases with subsequent publicity and digital marketing post-campaign and into VOD release). I also began a position working at Boosted, the e-commerce venture of the Arts Foundation of NZ in February, assisting artists with their crowdfunding campaigns on the Boosted crowdfunding platform.

Over the past 4 years I have been able to see what works in a campaign, what doesn’t, and the commonalities that add up to crowdfunding success and failure. One thing that remains true for every single crowdfunding campaign is this: preparation is vital.

So, how do you need to prepare for your crowdfunding campaign? Check out the steps below:

Identify your financial goal: you want to secure funds for your filmmaking, but how much do you need? Depending on whether you’re running a campaign to secure funds for pre or post-production, your financial goal may vary. What exactly are the campaign funds going to pay for? It sounds like a no-brainer, but sometimes (especially if you’re new to filmmaking) campaign managers are not entirely sure of how much they really need. Don’t forget- if you’re crowdfunding via a platform where you can offer perks, you need to fit this into your financial projection if you have physical perks which require printing, manufacture and/or posting.

Another thing to take into consideration with your financial projections is whether or not you have other sources of funds available to you. Do you have an angel investor on board? Have you applied for (and been successful with securing) funding from creative arts organizations? If so, what’s your overall budget, and how much will these other sources of funding add to the pot? If they are make up a substantial percentage of your financial goal, it might be worth considering avenues for funding other than crowdfunding to top your funding up, or you may choose to continue but with a conservative crowdfunding target in mind.

Research crowdfunding campaign platforms: thankfully there are now a plethora of crowdfunding campaign platforms available to suit every need and every goal, but sometimes this in itself can be overwhelming! That’s why it’s vital to research crowdfunding campaign platforms…and I’m not just talking a quick skim over the Terms and Conditions! The two main styles of crowdfunding are all-or-nothing (where you have to hit your campaign target to receive funds raised minus the platform’s fee), or flexible (where you receive all funds raised minus the platform’s fee, regardless of whether you hit 100% or not). Find out how much the platform charges percentage-wise for their fee and how this will affect your overall campaign goal. Do they offer consultation sessions, and if so, would you take them up on this? How much project support (both advice and technical support) do they offer?

Another important thing to look at is how donations are handled on the site. Are they processed at point-of-sale (as in when the contributor makes a donation), or are transactions on hold until the completion of a successful campaign/refunded until the completion of an unsuccessful campaign? This can also impact on your final funds.

It’s also great to talk to other filmmakers who have crowdfunded about their experiences and why they chose the particular platform they used. They can give you some vital advice that can help inform your decision.

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Identify your crowd: the most important factor in any crowdfunding campaign is your crowd…so who are they? There is a common misconception that a crowdfunding campaign is like Field of Dreams: if you build it, they will come, ‘they’ being fans of indie filmmaking and people who are not in your immediate network. It’s estimated that 90% of contributors to a crowdfunding campaign will actually come from your network, so it’s vital that you work out who is in your network first and foremost.

So, who is in your crowd, and what does your crowd look like?:

Crowdfunding For Filmmakers Network Mapping

Based on the infographic above, here’s what your network looks like:

Personal network: these are your friends, family, work groups, industry groups, your mailing list and your social media following. These are the people that will hopefully form the majority of your contributors.

Film’s network: the second rung of your network is the network for your film. This includes production companies, cast and crew, your film’s mailing list and social media accounts, as well as the fans of your actors and their networks, fans of your filmmaking and past films.

Other: the last rung of your network includes things like communities of interest (places where you’ve filmed or will be filming, interest groups for the subject of your film), fans of your film’s genre, as well as media connections like bloggers, news outlets and podcasters.

So, why identify your network?

  • It helps you to gauge how many people you potentially have in your immediate personal network so you can contact them accordingly to assist with first day donations
  • It can help you to prioritize when and how you approach potential contributors, especially with regards to publicity and social media
  • You can get a sense of how much grassroots support there is for your campaign

As you know, I’m always honest about my own experiences with publicity, social media marketing and crowdfunding, and when I first started I didn’t understand just how important it was to get support from your personal network. After all, they’re your friends and family, etc, so it’s a given that they’ll support you….right? I put more emphasis on doing outreach to media and influencers because at the time I believed (wrongly!) that publicity was the key (cue angelic music). Publicity can help, certainly, but it’s all about that crowd.

Work out your ‘why’ and hone your pitch and message: once you’ve picked your platform, you’ll want to think about things like your ‘why’, your pitch to contributors and your message to your networks. This is something which I could wax lyrical about all day, so it will be covered in a subsequent post, but for now it’s something to be aware of in the process.

You may notice that I haven’t mentioned perk selection, and the reason for this is that it may be that you choose not to run a crowdfunding campaign with a platform which allows for perks, and why selecting your perks is something to be considered in your financial projections, it’s less important in the initial stages than aspects like identifying your networks and doing due diligence on crowdfunding platforms.

Crowdfunding campaigns take time, care and preparation. It’s worth taking the time to get prepared so that you can make the most of the campaign period and hopefully reach your campaign target faster.

Thought this post was useful? It’s now part of our FREE resource, Crowdfunding Hints and Tips for Filmmakers, which you can download HERE. No purchase necessary, no opting into a mailing list, just click and download from our Dropbox.

 

 

REALLY Stuck For Blogging Ideas? Here’s Some Sanity Savers

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As you may know, we’ve made blogging for filmmakers a focus of our blog content this month, and SURPRISE! here’s a bonus entry to round out the month.

When it comes to growing your audience for your filmmaking, blogging is one of those things that is nice to have but isn’t essential. That being said, if you’re keen to add regular blogging to your film publicity arsenal, there can be times when you might be stuck for ideas. Eeek! I’ve been there! If you’re keen to do a blog post (or have a few up your sleeve for later), but find that suddenly the creative synapses are firing, here’s a few ideas to help get things revved up again. They’re based on my very own experiences of having a complete and utter ‘brain fart’ (for want of a better term):

Do a content digest: ever come across content on the web that you think everyone should see? No, not just cats in suits. Or maybe that’s just me….! Perhaps you find an inspiring TED talk about creativity, a SXSW chat with a filmmaker, or a book on screenwriting that rocked your socks off. These can be repurposed into a content digest blog post. I have done this several times on here, mostly because I had found books, videos apps and filmmaking tools that were too good not to share. In fact, one of the most visited and shared posts on this blog was The Indie Filmmaker’s PR and Digital Marketing Toolkit

Make a list: it sounds like a no-brainer, but how many times do we have ideas swirling in our brains like some delicious creative soup but we don’t write them down? Take some time, make a list, a mind map, a diagram…whatever your chosen recording method is. Get those potential blog post ideas down on paper and keep them somewhere you can refer to them for later. Another option if you’re not going to be doing a blog post updating people on your film’s progress, etc, is to have a jar on your desk where you’ve written blog post ideas on slips of paper and pick one.

Elaborate on past posts: perhaps you’ve touched briefly on a topic in a previous post and think it would make a really excellent separate post. Or perhaps you want to revisit an earlier post and elaborate further (or do an update). Either way, there can be some hidden gems in previous posts that can be teased out, repurposed or elaborated on in a fresh and exciting way in a new post.

Don’t sweat it: if you’re really, truly stuck…don’t sweat it! Walk away, do something completely different, or leave it for another day. Blogging shouldn’t be a chore or something you feel tied to. If you’re not feeling it, just leave it. And don’t feel obliged to write about the things you think people want to hear about, either. If it’s not something you’re passionate about sharing, don’t force it. I look at it like redecorating your living room. You redecorate your living room in the way you want to redecorate it, in a way that reflects you, your lifestyle and your family. You don’t look at the redecorating process and go: “gosh, I should have a red feature wall with my awards on it, because that’s what Cindy likes. If I don’t have that red feature wall, Cindy won’t want to come to our housewarming.” That redecorating analogy was brought to you due to the fact I’ve been binge watching Queer Eye on Netflix, but it’s true! There are way too many other things in life that cause pressure and stress, and blogging shouldn’t be one of them.

Happy filmmaking, and happy blogging! If you’ve enjoyed this month’s spotlight on blogging for filmmakers, we’ve got a treat in store for March. March is going to be a spotlight on crowdfunding, with loads of hints, tips and real world advice on how to make the most of crowdfunding your film.

Answering Questions About Blogging For Filmmakers

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This month we’ve been looking at how blogging can be another tool to assist you in growing your audience for your filmmaking, and gave you some ideas to help get you started. We end our focus on blogging this month by answering common questions about blogging for filmmakers. Hopefully our spotlight on blogging this month has, at the very least, given you another tool to consider when building your audience and promoting your films. Time to answer some common questions about blogging so you can be inspired to give it a try if you haven’t already!

Q: How often should I post? It depends on whether or not blogging is a big part of your marketing strategy for your filmmaking or a particular film you’re working on. You also need to take into account how busy you are at any given time- for instance, if you’re currently in principal photography chances are unless you have a team member dedicated to blogging on your behalf you’re not going to have a lot of time or energy to devote to such a rigorous posting schedule. Experts say you should post once or twice per week, but you don’t have to adhere to that particular rule, especially if you are posting regularly via social media.

You also don’t want to feel constrained by an obligation to post once or twice a week- you’re a creative person, and blogging shouldn’t feel like a chore. Post as often or as little as you like, but make sure you don’t have your blog going completely dead. Want to blog infrequently but still have a desire to create blog content about filmmaking or your film? See if there are indie film blogs and websites that would be interested in having you as a guest blogger.

Q: Where should I host my blog? The beauty of blogging is that there are hosting options a plenty! Depending on your website platform you may have the option to integrate a blog into that website (as we have). You may choose to operate a stand-alone blog in conjunction with your website. Alternatively, you may choose to have an account on a stand-alone publishing platform like Medium. It’s a good idea to weigh up your options before committing to something you may not end up using in the long-term.

The benefit of having your blog on your website is that it will help to drive more people to your website- they’ll come for the blog post and hopefully stay to look at your website.

Q: Should I share my blog posts on my social media channels? Absolutely! Blogging provides even more rich, shareable content to promote via social media. Some blogging platforms will have an integrated setting which allows you to share immediately to your social media channels when you publish, which takes the stress out of remembering to share your blog link.

Q: Help! I’m really stuck for content ideas! Have you tried turning it off and on again? Kidding!!! Check out our blog post about content ideas HERE. Currently filming or in post-production? You might want to see if one of your cast or crew would like to contribute a blog post, talking about the process. Perhaps your DoP wants to share some hints and tips, or one of your makeup SFX artists wants to share their career insights and give a sneak peek into their process. Blogging doesn’t have to be a solo effort.

Hopefully our spotlight on blogging in February has been food for thought. If you have a filmmaking blog (or you start one after reading our features on blogging), we’d love to know! Happy blogging and happy filmmaking!

 

Blogging For Filmmakers: Swipe These Ideas For Blog Content!

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This month, we’re focusing on blogging for filmmakers and how you can grow your audience and awareness for your filmmaking with a blog. The first post in the series covered some of the advantages of blogging, and now we’re diving deeper and looking at the type of content you can generate.

When it comes to blog content as a filmmaker, the sky is the limit! Here’s a few broad ideas to get you started if you’re completely new to blogging but want to start:

Updates on your film: one of the easiest ways to generate blog content is by providing filmmaking updates. Got a mailing list? You can cross-purpose your updates on both. Talk about your successes, let people in on great on-set anecdotes and happenings, and think about embedding some behind the scenes video or images.

Your filmmaking process: some filmmakers truly enjoy talking about the filmmaking process (both technical and creative), and some don’t. If you’re in the former category you might want to approach this with great gusto. Who and what inspires you and informs your creative process? If you chose to film on film instead of digitally, what was the reason? What challenges have you faced in your career? There are endless variations on this theme and so many more subjects that are great for blog posts.

Hot topics in filmmaking: there’s so many things happening in the film industry at any given day, whether it’s a studio merger, changes in the streaming and VOD landscape or other industry buzz there’s always something to write about. This is a great option if you’re particularly passionate about a hot topic. A word of caution from a publicity point-of-view: it’s best not to go off on a rant!

Guest blogging: want to write occasionally, but don’t have the time to commit to regular blogging? Guest blogging might be the idea for you. Providing blog content on another blog is also a great way to bring further awareness to your film and filmmaking. For instance, I recently guest blogged on We Make Movies on Weekends, talking about how movie PR works.

Sharing your filmmaking knowledge: this is another popular topic. Share filmmaking hints and tips, things you’ve learned in your filmmaking career, and offer advice. Share the wealth of knowledge you’ve gained through your filmmaking. This is something I do often on the Sprites blog, partly as another way of showing that I don’t just talk the talk when it comes to publicity of indie films, I also walk the walk and can show you ways of growing your audience and securing media (just like with this post).

In the next post on blogging for filmmakers, we’ll look at what to do when you want to blog…but you’re really stuck! I’ve got a few techniques to help the ideas flow.

How Blogging Can Assist With Promoting Your Indie Film or Webseries

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In the 21st century we tend to take things like blogging and social media for granted. It’s part of our everyday landscape. It’s easy enough to check your social media feeds and read a blog you love about a topic you’re passionate about. Back in the late 1990s when the Internet was starting to become mainstream blogging and social media were twinkles in the eye of their creators.

Blogging as we know it today didn’t exist, but there were websites which served as proto-blogging/ social media platforms, like Open Diary (which is now a subscription-only service) and Live Journal. You could share your thoughts and feelings with people around the globe, build up an audience…well, you get the picture. We now do this with social media and via blogs. These days, for every interest or topic there is a blog to match, including film.

Now, as you may already know, we’ve talked at length about how social media can assist with promotion of your film, but what about blogs? What benefits are to be gained by blogging regularly, and how can they translate into growing your audience for your films and filmmaking? This month we’ll be answering these questions and giving you some suggestions to help you create great content that people will not only enjoy but will share with their networks.

So, how can blogging be beneficial for promoting your indie film or webseries?

1. You can provide your fans with filmmaking updates: the beauty of blogging is that there are no hard-and-fast rules when it comes to the content you create, and updating your fans and audience is one way of producing great content. It can often be used instead of, or in tandem with, an email mailing list (but we’ll talk more about that in later posts).

2. It provides another way to reach and connect with your target audience: blogging can provide another piece of the audience building and publicity puzzle in conjunction with social media and earned and/or paid traditional media coverage. Not everyone likes or uses social media, so this is another way to reach hearts and minds online.

3. It can be beneficial when it comes to SEO of your website: if you choose to have a blog on your website as opposed to solely having a stand-alone blog, your posts can assist with site views and engagement through the tags, categories, blog titles and excerpts you choose to use for each post. Prior to having a blog on the Film Sprites PR website it was just a website, and once I began blogging regularly the site saw a huge upswing in visits which also culminated in more queries about PR and digital marketing services and more clients!

4. You can let people in on your filmmaking process: one thing I’ve seen filmmakers do very successfully with blogging is they let their audience in on their process. Just as behind-the-scenes photos and videos give audiences a tangible taste of your filmmaking, blogging can be a longer form of this. There are endless subjects to write about, and if you’re a keen writer and love sharing your process, inspiration and ideas then blogging is a very valuable tool for you to consider.

Stay tuned for our next post as we focus on blogging for filmmakers in February!