Coronavirus and Cancelled Film Festivals: Where to Now?

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Last year was my first experience with SXSW, albeit in a remote capacity. Film Sprites PR was providing social media marketing for independent film Alice in the run-up to and duration of the Festival. The micro-budget first feature from Josephine Mackerras would win Best Narrative Feature and the inaugural CherryPicks Female First Award. It was a true honour to assist a filmmaker in an arena like SXSW; a Festival I had long admired.

News of the cancellation of SXSW 2020 hit me harder than I’d expected. I didn’t have any films in the Festival (either as a publicist or producer), but my heart immediately went out to every filmmaker whose film had been selected for the Festival this year. In particular, reading filmmaker Cooper Raiff’s comments in the IndieWire article about the cancellation put a huge lump in my throat. I think my heart broke further for filmmakers in that moment.

In addition to SXSW, there has also been the cancellation of the Cleveland International Film Festival, also due to Coronavirus. This, and the cancellation of SXSW 2020 is a wise decision from a disease control point-of-view, but let’s face it: it sucks. It’s a terrible situation to be in if you’re a filmmaker whose film was selected; especially if it’s your first film or your first time being selected for a Festival (or both).

EDIT: at the time of posting, the Beverly Hills Film Festival, the Full Frame Festival and the New York Children’s Film Festival had also cancelled their events due to COVID-19 fears. Denmark’s Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival has cancelled their physical event and is now planning a virtual stand-in.

So what can we do as a community to assist these filmmakers?

Thankfully the response has been overwhelming. Here’s a few alternatives that have arisen as a response to the SXSW cancellation (note: I will be adding to these regularly as new initiatives arise):

– On Twitter, the #SXSW2020 hashtag has yielded an incredible amount of reviewers who have offered to review and promote films which were going to be screened at the Festival. If you had a film that was playing at the Festival, search the hashtag and you’ll find some really thoughtful reviewers who want to help boost the signal. As I stated above, there are several other Festivals which have also been cancelled, so I encourage people who had films in these Festivals to also do a Twitter search based on posts about these Festivals to see if there are reviewers wanting to also boost the signal.

Stage 32 is offering a place to showcase SXSW 2020 projects. Stage 32 has “a global community of over 600,000 members, which includes distributors, buyers and sales agents, as well as hundreds of executives and educators who work with Stage 32 including managers, agents, financiers, development execs, and producers.” There is no fee for this service.

– If you run a film review site and haven’t offered to showcase selected films from cancelled Festivals, please think about doing so. Many Festival selections receive a boost from not only their selection at a Festival, but the reviews they receive. It’s also a great opportunity to forge a relationship with up-and-coming filmmakers and support their work going forward.

– If you have a film which was scheduled to play at any of the cancelled festivals mentioned above, contact us with your film’s trailer, your social media handles and a press kit and we will boost the signal through our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram  (please note: will will only be doing this for films that were selected to be shown at the Festivals above at this stage). If you have an initiative to assist these filmmakers, please also feel free to get in touch and we’ll update this post with the details.

Women and Hollywood wants to help filmmakers affected by the cancellation of SXSW or other Festivals; helping to amplifying crowdfunding campaigns to help recoup any losses due to cancellations. They will be publishing weekly crowdfunding features highlighting projects by and/or about women that have been impacted by a coronavirus-related cancellation.

And whether you’re a filmmaker or not: please take care of yourself. Wash your hands regularly and avoid touching your face. And let’s not stockpile toilet paper!

FAQs About Working With A Film Publicist

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The indie film landscape has changed in the past 20 years in new and exciting ways. Filmmakers can cut out the middle man and self-distribute, there are avenues for distribution open now (including the streaming services) that weren’t open at the start of the 21st century, and filmmakers can grow their audience right in the comfort of their own homes thanks to social media.

Film publicity is changing, too. Long gone are the days when it was just a matter of sending out a press release and phoning up a journalist to secure an article in a newspaper or a piece on the nightly news. Publicity now regularly involves going beyond the traditional media and connecting with social media influencers, as well as websites, blogs, and podcasts. Social media marketing is usually intertwined with publicity to give great results (and extend the reach of the filmmaker as well).

Of course, this also means the possibilities for filmmakers to self-promote are also boundless.

Does that mean the film publicist is becoming obsolete, especially for independent films?

Not quite. There are advantages to having a film publicist on board (check them out HERE). Once your film has secured distribution, chances are you will have a publicist attached thanks to the distribution company…but there are also some instances pre-distribution when a publicist can come in handy:

  • If your film has been selected by a top-tier film festival
  • If you have cinematic screenings or VOD and want to secure reviews, interviews and features
  • If you want to grow your media presence to help your work to be noticed

Those three instances are primarily the reasons independent filmmakers have come to me for assistance over the years.

And during my time as a publicist, social media marketer and crowdfunding consultant, I’ve had questions about publicity for film that pop up frequently. With that in mind, I’m answering these frequently asked questions so you know just what a publicist can be expected to do…and what they can’t (or won’t) do!

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Q: Can You Make Me Go Viral?

A: The short-and-sweet answer is ‘no’. The longer answer is that no publicist can guarantee virality. It’s not possible. If someone tries to convince you to put up your hard-earned dollars in exchange for guaranteed virality of your content, it’s a scam. The lifespan of virality is shortening, thanks to the sheer amount of content in front of us every single day.

In a previous post, I said this about virality, but I think it’s worth echoing here:

If you use virality as a sole benchmark for the success of your work, you’re going to end up feeling pretty bad about things- not because your work isn’t great, but because virality is so unpredictable and on the decline. There’s also this myth that going viral means you become an overnight success and everything is peachy keen. That can happen for some, but the experience is different in every case.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with wanting your work to go viral, but it’s not up to anyone else, whether it’s a publicist or a social media marketer, to make that happen. Instead, I suggest securing reviews, interviews and features. Reviews in particular are useful, because they can provide quotes for your posters and promotional artwork.

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Q: Do all publicists also do social media marketing?

A: it depends on the individual publicist these days. Some publicity companies will also do social media marketing, whereas I know some freelance publicists who might only do publicity and won’t handle social media marketing. I do both, because one complements the other. By having publicity and social media marketing, you’re reaching your audience right where they’re ‘at’, whether that’s scrolling their Facebook feed or reading a local community newspaper. It’s a win-win.

Q: Can I get a friend or crew member to do my publicity?

A: if they have a background in publicity and/or have had experience writing things like press releases or your press kit, I say go for it. The one thing I caution against is using fans to do your publicity or social media, because those relationships can sour, and sour badly. I’ve seen it happen, it’s always ugly and potentially impacts on the reputation of the filmmaker. Avoid at all costs.

Q: Do I have to pay a publicist?

A: if you’re getting an outside agency or a marketing freelancer to do your publicity and/or social media marketing, then the answer is a resounding YES. I once had a filmmaker whom I’d never even spoken to in my life trolling me for about a year on social media because he objected to the fact that I charged for my services.

Here’s the thing: I trained up to be a publicist, and it took hours of study and implementation, coupled with the five years of publicity and social media marketing experience I now possess. This is a job for me, and I also have bills to pay like everyone else. That’s the same for every freelancer, regardless of their expertise. Freelance does NOT mean free.

It’s worth noting that when you pay a publicist, you’re paying them to do publicity work like reaching out to media outlets/influencers/websites. Their work should not be dependent on the result of that outreach. Nor is it dependent on the amount of digital sales generated for your VOD, or ticket sales for your screening. Think of it this way: a shoe-maker is paid for their work creating shoes, not on their ability to turn the wearer of the shoes into a marathon winner.

Q: Can you get me into Variety/Empire Magazine?

A: The ability to secure something in a big publication like Variety or Empire really depends on a few factors: how far along in your career are you? Does your film have well-known actors? What are the newsworthy elements of your film?

Every filmmaker wants to appear in the well-known film publications and in the mainstream news (which is an awesome goal), but depending on the factors I mentioned above it might not be possible. When a first-time director comes to me with a no-budget short film which has no well-known actors attached, it’s going to be more difficult to secure press in ‘big’ media outlets. One of the reasons for this is that these days with traditional media (newspapers, television, magazines, radio), newsrooms are being downsized, articles are being syndicated (which means less room for unique local content), and more people are turning to the Internet for their news. It means that stories about films and filmmakers have to compete for space, and so that space is quite often taken up by the big blockbusters with huge budgets and an A-list cast.

It also depends on your timeframe for requiring features and interviews in mainstream media: bear in mind that the traditional news sources (especially magazines) will tend to have their editorial calendars booked well in advance. If you come to a publicist in November wanting a feature on your Christmas story in the next edition of a magazine, your chances are slimmer than if your publicist has time to pitch at least three months in advance.

In other words, there are possibilities to appear in larger publications or mainstream news, but timing is everything. You can, however, secure quite a number of reviews, features and interviews with local newspapers, podcasts, community access radio, websites dedicated to film (especially ones dedicated to genre films if you have a horror or sci-fi film), etc. Don’t discredit these sources- podcasts are still massive in terms of reaching audiences, you’ll find hardcore fans for your film on the genre film websites, and community newspapers are often keen to pick up a story if you’ve done location shoots in their circulation area. Every positive piece of media exposure helps!

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Q: How often should I check in with my publicist?

A: It depends on the nature of your project, and how long you’re working with a publicist for. It’s completely fine to get in touch with them with regards to any queries you have (e.g. someone at a Festival coming up to you and wanting to know if you have a press kit available, etc) as that’s part of the process. The one thing I would caution against is checking in on a daily basis to see how much media exposure you’ve received. Your publicist will let you know of any interviews, reviews or features that have been posted or published, and will liaise with you to schedule interviews with journalists. They cannot push a journalist or publication to post or publish content any faster- journalists and editors work on their own timeframe (and in the case of podcasters and bloggers they’re often having to fit their film work in around other commitments unless they’re able to podcast/blog full-time).

So there you have it! Whether you hire a publicist or not, at the very least you know what to expect if you get to the point where a publicist might be handy.

While I have your attention….

Film Sprites PR has now provided 5 prizes of $1000 worth of film marketing as part of this year’s AFIN International Film Festival prize pool! The winners of Best Feature Film, Best Australian Film, Best Short Film, Best Documentary Feature and Best Documentary Short will receive:

• 1 hour Skype consultation with director and/or producer to answer your burning questions and discuss your needs and goals

• A bespoke publicity and social media marketing plan tailored to their needs and goals (at the time of winning the award)
• 1 month’s publicity and social media marketing advice on-call (e.g. will answer any emails related to marketing plan and give advice)
• 1 month’s social media marketing cross-promotion on Film Sprites PR’s social media channels (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter).

Sounds like the kind of prize you’d find useful? Make sure you submit your work to the AFIN International Film Festival 2020 HERE.

 

Great Reasons to Support Your Local Independent Cinema

Support Local Independent Cinema

We have such a wealth of choices when it comes to how, when and where we watch films now, but there’s still nothing that beats the cinema-going experience. In every large city there’s generally several options to indulge in that cinema-going experience (including cinema chains), but how often do you see a film at your local independent cinema?

There’s a scene (SPOILER ALERT!!!!) in Craig Brewer’s fantastic film Dolemite is My Name that I find truly inspiring: after the blood, sweat, and tears of making Dolemite, Rudy Ray Moore fails to secure a distributor. Things come to a head when a radio DJ wants to know when people can see the film. Off air, Moore confesses that they don’t have a distributor, which prompts the DJ to suggest a small cinema that might host the film. Moore would have to pay for a screening, but could keep the profits. And after some enthusiastic hustling to promote the film it not only sells out, but has a genuinely appreciative audience. Thank you, independent cinema owner!

I can honestly say that this year I saw only one film at a cinema chain. The rest of my viewings were at independent cinemas in Wellington (during NZIFF 2019) and Christchurch. This wasn’t a strategic decision…it just turned out that the independent cinemas were screening the films I wanted to see over the blockbuster fare that was available at the cinema chains. As a result, I fell back in love with independent cinemas, and I hope after reading this you will too. Below are some reasons to support your local independent cinemas; both as an audience member and a filmmaker:

They screen great independent, foreign language, and genre films: Parasite, High Life, Amazing Grace, Maiden…chances are, if you were a New Zealander and saw any of these films this year in cinema, it was probably at one of the independent cinemas dotted around the country. Sometimes you don’t want to wait for something to come out on VOD or a streaming platform, and independent cinemas are great at bringing those films to you. They can’t bring everything to the big screen, sadly, but they bring their audiences a very fine selection each year.

They’re a great destination for film festival fare and small festivals: in my home town, Christchurch, we are fortunate enough to have Lumière Cinemas as one of the screening destinations for the New Zealand International Film Festival (along with the Isaac Theatre Royal), but this year they have also hosted the inaugural Christchurch leg of the Terror-Fi Film Festival and are soon to host Madman Reel Anime 2019 as well!

The Hollywood Avondale in Auckland is known for their legendary 24 Hour Movie Marathon, which is in its 20th year in 2019. Check out your local independent cinema, as they can often host great festivals which bring you unique fare (and sometimes before general release).

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They host special and limited screenings: whether it’s a Rocky Horror Picture Show sing-a-long screening, a big screen showing of The Room or a movie marathon, independent cinemas bring you the good stuff. Scrolling through the event listings of an independent cinema on their website can feel like their offerings were tailored for you, and you alone. After seeing Midsommar at NZIFF 2019, I absolutely jumped at the chance to see the director’s cut on the big screen (and traumatise my partner, who didn’t see the theatrical cut beforehand).

There are independent cinemas that are opting to screen some of the Netflix films which were available for theatrical release as well (The Guardian has a great explanation of why some theatre chains are opting not to offer these screenings). I went to see The King on the big screen before it hit Netflix, partly because I wanted to be a sort of ‘guinea pig’ for the small theatrical release window, but mostly because I’m a massive fan of David Michôd’s filmmaking, as well as the Shakespeare Henriad that the film is based on. It was definitely well worth seeing on the big screen due to the battle scenes, but it’s also a bit of a treat to see it before it hits Netflix. It will be interesting to see how this format of screening windows develops in the future, but for now there’s independent cinemas that are embracing it wholeheartedly.

In 2016, Academy Cinemas very graciously hosted the advanced screening and Q&A session of Life Off Grid (a film Film Sprites PR was doing the NZ publicity and social media marketing for). Despite the fact that Quentin Tarantino was in town for the Hateful Eight premiere, ardent fans of independent documentaries and sustainability turned up to welcome the film wholeheartedly.

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They’re designed with cinephiles in mind: the one thing I’ve noticed about independent cinemas over cinema chains is that the independent cinemas are a haven for cinephiles. Plush seating, opulent surroundings, and quite often there’s wine and cheese platters on offer for those who really want to revel in their cinematic experience (also great for date night!).

Enjoy a signature cocktail at an indie cinema bar, or catch up with a friend post-screening for coffee. And trust me, I’ve never met a coffee at an independent cinema I didn’t like.

They often support local content: here’s a tip for independent filmmakers if you are self-distributing (or want to host an event or cast screening of your film): get in touch with your local independent cinema. Often they have reasonable rates for screening films or fundraising nights, so it’s worth checking out what they may be able to do for you. And, hey, you might end up doing a Dolemite….

 

5 Reasons You Should Contribute to the Raindance Film Festival Crowdfunding Campaign

5 Reasons You Should Contribute to the Raindance Film Festival Crowdfunding Campaign

As you may know, this month we’ve been doing a focus on crowdfunding for filmmakers, and in a moment of synchronicity the IndieGoGo campaign for the 2018 Raindance Film Festival has begun! I don’t know about you, but I’m passionate about film festivals. Festivals are a celebration of cinema and a showcase of some of the best films around, and Raindance is no different.

So, why should you dig into your wallet and contribute to the crowdfunding campaign for this year’s Raindance Film Festival? Here’s 5 very good reasons:

1. It’s the UK’s oldest and largest film festival

Film festivals may come and go, but Raindance has some serious chops, celebrating its 25th festival last year. Not only that, it’s been run independently for those 25 years. In addition, past festivals have screened some seriously excellent and very well-known films like Pulp Fiction, The Blair Witch Project, Once, Oldboy, What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, Ghost World and Memento; proof that the Raindance Film Festival has always had its finger firmly on the pulse of independent cinema.

Raindance FF Past Screeners

2. The Raindance Film Festival keeps current with technological changes in the film industry

As well as having an eye for the hottest independent films and bringing them to you every festival, Raindance keeps abreast of technological changes which arise in the film industry, like Virtual Reality (VR). This year with the help of your contribution they are looking to develop a cutting-edge festival app. This has two benefits: firstly, it’s convenient. As someone who has used similar apps for conferences and festivals, it’s much easier to whip out your phone and check information or a schedule than rummage around in your bag for a paper copy. Secondly, it cuts down on paper waste. In an era where we’re more conscious of sustainable practices, Raindance is making the effort to embrace sustainability.

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Speaking of sustainability….

3. Raindance has environmental and sustainability goals for the 2018 festival

In addition to the app mentioned above, for film buffs who love to collect the commemorative catalogues Raindance wants to print the 2018 catalogue on eco-friendly paper (which is more expensive), whilst also keeping the catalogue free. That’s quite an undertaking financially, but it’s one of the lengths Raindance wants to go to in order to be a more environmentally conscious festival and keep costs down for audiences at the same time. Just think- your contribution to the campaign will help make that a reality…makes you want to re-think today’s latte order and give that money to the campaign, doesn’t it?

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4. Raindance wants to continue to make independent cinema accessible

Independent cinema should be for everyone, and this year Raindance has some goals to ensure that it remains that way. Firstly, they want to keep tickets discounted for under 25s, students, senior citizens, claimants, first responders and carers. They also want to support filmmakers from disadvantaged backgrounds to attend the Festival via the 25×25 project in collaboration with the Independent Film Trust. They also want to ensure that there are no barriers for audiences with hearing and/or visual disabilities to attend festival screenings and seminars. How great is that?

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If these reasons alone haven’t sold you on contributing, then there’s one more reason:

5. The perks are EPIC!

There’s some serious swag at every perk level; from shout-outs to some seriously stylish Raindance branded gear (T-shirts, tote bags, badges). There’s also some unique perks that would defintely suit businesses or individuals looking to make their mark and be seen, like the ‘Adopt A Film’ perk where your logo will be put next to your selected film in the catalogue plus additional perks. Plus there’s festival passes, VIP tickets to the Independent Filmmakers Ball and much more!

If you’re as passionate about independent cinema as I am, this is a truly worthy campaign to contribute to. Make your mark and contribute HERE. Can’t contribute right now? Spread the word! On the campaign page the Raindance team have put together a selection of pre-made Tweets that are super-easy to copy and Tweet out to your followers.

Help Raindance meet their goals for this year’s festival, and help keep the festival in the beating heart of London and accessible to all.

 

 

Handy Resources for Indie Filmmakers

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Following the success of our blog post featuring PR and digital marketing resources for indie filmmakers, we’re back with even more general resources! These are things that are too good not to share. After all, it’s all about working smarter, not harder. Here’s some resources we stumbled across recently that we think you’ll like:

Distribution expert Peter Broderick recently taught a masterclass about the New World of Film Distribution at NZ’s Big Screen Symposium 2017, and it was hugely informative. Thankfully, you don’t have to have attended the session to make the most of his information- check out his post on the New World of Film Distribution HERE.

Want to know what types of low budget films break out? film industry Stephen Follows and Founder of The Numbers, Bruce Nash, bring you a comprehensive report that is well worth reading.

For people in the NZ film industry, ScreenSpace is a free website which acts as a classified ads service for people in the industry. Hire/sell equipment and services, post jobs (crew jobs, acting, etc), and more.

Jonathan and Kieran, the creators of ScreenSpace say: “After always struggling to find either a location, cast member, crew member or piece of gear on every shoot we’ve had, we decided to start ScreenSpace to make it easier for New Zealand filmmakers to connect and collaborate – sharing both their resources and expertise. A service by filmmakers for filmmakers to find what they want, when they need it, and for a reasonable price.”

Another excellent resource for NZ filmmakers is Showtools, a cloud-based production system which makes the production process easier. Better yet, Showtools has easy pay-as-you go pricing…and short films are FREE. Keep track of work hours, crew and rentals, and share product information with everyone easily. It’s a smart, affordable resource to make your film production less stressful and more streamlined.

Whether you’re keen to enter your film into a festival, or need to know how the screening dates of prominent festivals could affect your release and/or the publication schedules for film media, check out this handy guide to key festivals and markets.

And finally- some shaaaaaaaaaameless self-promotion: at Film Sprites PR we’re currently taking on films (short and feature-length) for publicity and digital marketing in 2018. The best time to chat with us about PR and social media marketing for your film next year is right now in order to secure our services. From copywriting for your website and IMDb profile, right through to sourcing media placements (features/reviews/interviews) and social media marketing, we do it all. For the past 3.5 years we’ve provided 25+ filmmakers and their films publicity and digital marketing, and because we focus on independent film we know the media landscape and market for indie films. For more info, download our services pamphlet HERE.

Happy filmmaking, folks!

 

Our Picks of the Flicks At NZIFF 2017

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It’s that time of year again- time to gear up for the New Zealand International Film Festival! Not content to warm the cockles of the hearts of one region in NZ, the NZIFF brings cinematic delights to Auckland, Christchurch, Dunedin, Gore, Hamilton, Hawke’s Bay, Masterton, Nelson, New Plymouth, Tauranga, Timaru and Wellington (dates of Festival and selections vary depending on region).

Without doubt, Christchurch’s Isaac Theatre Royal is a magnificent venue in which to experience what the Festival has to offer, and it has risen like a phoenix rising from the ashes in post-quake Christchurch. After sustaining damage during the 22nd February earthquake (and subsequent aftershocks) in 2011, the Isaac Theatre Royal was lovingly rebuilt and restored to glory (find out the history of the theatre here) and was fully equipped to bring the magic of cinema back into such a grand establishment. In order to accommodate the sheer number of cinematic delights on offer each year, Hoyts Northlands also holds a number of screenings during the Festival.

NZIFF brings the best of the world and Aotearoa to film lovers every year, and 2017 is no exception. Here’s some of our picks for the Christchurch leg of the Festival:

Homegrown Delights

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Nic Gorman’s Human Traces

NZIFF is always a fantastic place to celebrate the creativity and energy of local filmmakers, and this year is no exception. Christchurch has the privilege of  hosting not one but three films making their world premiere this year. Debuting at the festival are Human Traces, One Island of Good and Seven Rivers Walking- Haere Mārire, all of which have special connections to the Christchurch area. Kiwi filmmaker Toa Fraser has two offerings in the festival this year, the nail-biting hostage thriller 6 Days (starring Mark Strong, Abbie Cornish and Jamie Bell) and extreme sports documentary The Free Man.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that Festival fave Florian Habicht is back with Spookers, a look behind the scares at the popular fun park occupying the former Kingseat Psychiatric Hospital. After seeing the trailer at the NZIFF programme launch, it was hard not to be charmed by the many characters who bring the scares to life for eager patrons.

And one of the most eagerly anticipated Kiwi films has to be Gaylene Preston’s My Year With Helen, an intimate observational documentary as Preston follows former NZ Prime Minister Helen Clark during her candidacy for the position of UN Secretary General. Both Christchurch screenings feature a Q+A with director Gaylene Preston at the end of the film.

Fresh From Cannes

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Ruben Östlund’s The Square

Yet again the Festival brings the best of Cannes to Aotearoa with some hotly anticipated films. Fresh from receiving the Palme d’Or at Cannes 2017, Ruben Östlund’s The Square is satire at its best. Fans of Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster can rejoice as he returns with The Killing of a Sacred Deer, starring Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell. Cinephiles get a double dose of Kidman and Farrell as both also star in another Cannes selection, Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled. Other Cannes picks include Wind River, Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Loveless and Miike Takashi’s Blade of the Immortal.

Classic Cinema Experiences

Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker

As if the amazing fresh picks above weren’t enough for cinephiles, NZIFF is bringing Christchurch fans to two incredible cinematic experiences from the past. A definite must-see is Andrei Tarkovsky’s newly restored post-apocalyptic classic, Stalker. If you’re a Tarkovsky fan but have never seen his work on the big screen, now’s the time. And finally, the incredible Christchurch Symphony Orchestra provides the live soundtrack for Christchurch NZIFF’s Live Cinema event, Buster Keaton’s classic silent comedy Our Hospitality. No doubt it will be an event to treasure.

This is just a fraction of what NZIFF 2017 has to offer, so make sure you head over to the website. There you’ll find the full programme, and if you sign up for My NZIFF you can build a wishlist for this year’s festival. Avoid timetabling clashes and build the Festival schedule of your dreams with the click of a button!

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We want to say a huge, heartfelt thank you to everyone at NZIFF, the volunteers in every region, as well as the Christchurch team and the Isaac Theatre Royal for putting on a genuinely magnificent programme launch this week. We know the Festival is going to be a tremendous success this year.