Dispelling Popular Crowdfunding Myths

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Before I started Film Sprites PR in 2014 I started to test the waters of social media and publicity for film by assisting with promotion of crowdfunding campaigns. It was 2013, I was fresh from studying, and crowdfunding was a new and exciting world to me, and to filmmakers who wanted to cut out the middle man when it came to funding their films.

Fast forward to 2020 and every man and their dog knows what crowdfunding is. Thousands of shorts and features have had crowdfunding campaigns on platforms like Kickstarter, IndieGoGo, Seed & Spark and Go Fund Me (and that’s for starters!). Thousands of dollars have been raised in campaign funds, and films have gone ahead.

Since my initial dive into the world of crowdfunding, I’ve been involved in successful campaigns for films like Us Among the Stones, which debuted at the BFI London Film Festival last year, WW II film Magpie, and finishing funds for RAIN: A Fan Film About Storm. And then, as luck would have it, I took up a position at Boosted, the crowdfunding platform of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand and gave artists crowdfunding advice that assisted them in creating amazing things like the short film Memory Foam, the outrageously funny webseries These Two, and the feature documentary Peter Peryer: The Art of Seeing, which debuted at the New Zealand International Film Festival in 2019. I even had the great privilege of presenting a session on crowdfunding for filmmakers with a Boosted colleague for theNew Zealand Film Commission‘s Fresh Shorts Intensive Weekend.

I’ve seen what works with crowdfunding, and what doesn’t.

I’ve also seen crowdfunding myths pop up time and again; things that don’t seem to go away. They’re things which seem reasonable enough, but are counter-intuitive to successful crowdfunding. Today, I’m going to let you in on those myths, AND give you alternatives that will help you reach your target.

Myth 1: You Have to Have a Really High Target to Be Successful

shower of money

If someone has a crowdfunding campaign for upwards of $100,000 I’m going to ask why.

Perhaps if you’re an A-List director and hiring well-known actors, have loads of location shoots, a multitude of crew and have a massive VFX budget, then that figure might be correct. But if you’re a director who is directing their first short on a shoestring and only need around $10,000 then chances are you’re not going to need that much.

There’s nothing wrong with being ambitious, however when it comes to crowdfunding you have to think very pragmatically (especially since crowdfunding is like having another full time job in and of itself). When people tell me they want a really high target for their crowdfunding campaign, their logic tends to be along the lines of: “if we have a really high target, people will think we’ve got a huge production and that will make them more likely to contribute to the campaign.”

There’s a few problems with this:

1. If you’re on an all-or-nothing crowdfunding platform and your campaign is unsuccessful, the risk of not reaching your target increases the higher your target is.

2. If you have a campaign with a really high target and it’s unsuccessful, it looks less impressive than a campaign that has reached (or exceeded) its target. A smaller target that is tracking well percentage-wise during a campaign makes people more likely to contribute to the campaign than a large target that is not tracking well.

So, what’s a more practical target? Here’s the formula I give people:

  • First, work out exactly how much you need to make your film/webseries. If you’re crowdfunding in pre-production, you’ll need to work out how much it’s going to cost for everything you need, e.g. equipment hire, catering, paying your cast and crew, etc. In post, work out what you need to finish the film and how much that’s going to cost (e.g. sound, colouring, reshoots).
  • Look at the percentage the crowdfunding platform will take in fees and add that percentage onto your total (e.g. if the platform charges 10%, add 10% to your figure)

That’s what your total should be. The benefit of this is that if you achieve your target prior to the close of your campaign, you can then continue promoting your campaign on social media and go for a ‘stretch goal’ of some type.

One thing to also keep in mind is whether or not you’re offering physical perks during your campaign, because that will impact on the total amount as well. Some campaigns with perks ask contributors to add an additional amount (around $10-$15) onto their contribution to cover postage and packaging costs. It’s entirely up to you as to whether or not you do this.

Myth 2: Long Campaign Durations Are Best

long crowdfunding campaigns

One of the myths that seems to come up time and again is the idea that if you run a long campaign (two months or more), that it will be more successful because it gives people more time to contribute. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way!

Crowdfunding campaigns tend to have a pattern: the first week of campaign you’ll see a flurry of contributions, then contributions will tend to slow down in the following 1-2 weeks, with momentum picking up again in the last 7 days.

So, why do I recommend not having a long campaign duration?

  1. Crowdfunding is a time-consuming process. Successful campaigns mean a LOT of sweat equity. A 30 day campaign can be exhausting, but if you stretch it out to 60-90 days it means you’re going to have to keep going. How is that going to impact on your personal life, your professional life, and your filmmaking?
  2. Another issue is that if your campaign is not going well, you might be tempted to give up on it altogether. And I don’t want to see that happening with anyone!

A good campaign duration is 30 days. The reason for this is that it keeps to a concise, manageable timeframe, and you are able to receive contributions from people with varying pay cycles (e.g. fortnightly, weekly). It also means that your own personal momentum is maintained, and trust me- enthusiasm is infectious!

Myth 3: If People Are Cinephiles, They’ll Contribute

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Here’s the thinking behind this common myth: people love movies, so they’re going to support my campaign because of this.

If only this were true!

The reality is that the majority of your crowdfunding contributions (around 90%) will come from your immediate network (friends, family, work groups, industry groups, your mailing list and your social media following) as opposed to people unconnected to your immediate network. That doesn’t mean you can’t get those contributions, it’s just prudent to make sure they’re not the focus of your contribution hopes. You can find out more about how to prep your crowdfunding campaign (and identify your network for your campaign) HERE.

Myth 4: A Crowdfunding Campaign Doesn’t Require Any Effort

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Crowdfunding: it’s easy money, right? Your campaign page goes live, and the money starts rolling in.

Errrr…not quite.

A crowdfunding campaign is like having another full-time job. Between writing the copy for your page, getting a pitch video ready and reaching out to your networks via social media and/or e-mail, it takes time.

Think of it this way: if you were doing investor relations face-to-face with someone, you’d have things like a pitch deck, a treatment, and you’d be able to break down your film budget. Crowdfunding is very much like investor relations, but online.

Crowdfunding is not a magic ATM machine. The more time you put into prepping and promoting your campaign, the easier it will be the next time you need to do face-to-face investor relations, because the skills overlap somewhat.

If you’re looking for ‘easy money’, crowdfunding is probably not for you.

If you are just crowdfunding because you think it will bring awareness to your project or that you’ll go viral, crowdfunding is probably not for you.

If you don’t have the time to plan a campaign, keep your contributors updated and promote your campaign on social media throughout the funding duration, crowdfunding is probably not for you.

And if it’s not for you, that’s okay too! I’ve spoken with people who, after weighing up the pros and cons, have decided not to run a campaign and have successfully gained the funds they needed for their projects through other means. Crowdfunding is another option in the arts funding landscape, not the be-all end-all. You can always apply for grants and scholarships, do investor relations face-to-face with private investors, or look for angel equity.

So there you have it- some of the most common crowdfunding myths dispelled.

There’s much more about crowdfunding available on the blog. If you’re interested, check out these posts:

It’s a Marathon, Not a Sprint: Looking After Yourself During a Crowdfunding Campaign

How to Harness Twitter for Your Film’s Crowdfunding Campaign

What Part Should Publicity Play in Your Crowdfunding Campaign?

Crowdfunding and the Benefits for Indie Filmmakers

 

It’s CROWDFUNDING WEEK at Film Sprites PR!

Crowdfunding for Filmmakers

The film funding landscape has changed over the past 10 years. With the advent of crowdfunding, the ability to secure funds for films and webseries has been put into the hands of filmmakers across the globe. It’s a very exciting time to be involved in film, because crowdfunding gives you the ability to manage your funding on your terms. It also has the added benefit of growing and maintaining an audience for your film or webseries.

So…what’s my background with crowdfunding, you may ask? I started my career in film publicity and social media marketing through assisting with crowdfunding campaigns. Initially, this was just by amplifying the signal via social media. When Film Sprites PR was established, this extended to securing publicity for filmmakers and their crowdfunding campaigns and actively assisting with the creation of campaign strategy. I’ve assisted with the successful campaigns for Magpie, Arcadia Bay, Vampire Mob Graphic Novel Issue 1 and RAIN: A Fan Film About Storm as well as the Kickstarter for the award-winning short film Hello World. Most recently, a film I assisted with post-production crowdfunding, Us Among the Stones debuted at the 2019 BFI London Film Festival.

In addition, I also worked at Boosted, the crowdfunding platform of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand as Projects and Operations Assistant, specializing in film crowdfunding. Including 5 years under the Sprites mantle, I’ve had around 7 years of crowdfunding experience across various platforms, including Kickstarter, Social Screen and IndieGoGo. I’ve seen the good and bad of crowdfunding, the pitfalls, the triumphs, the things that people don’t necessarily think about when they set out to crowdfund their film or webseries. Crowdfunding can be exciting…but in order for a campaign to be successful it also requires a lot of planning.

This week on the blog and on our social media we’ll be looking at various aspects of crowdfunding; from planning to some of the unusual things that may crop up in your campaign. If you’re not following Sprites on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, make sure you follow so you don’t miss a second. PLUS- there’s going to be some great FREEBIES headed your way too!

 

Our Year in Review…and a Freebie for You!

It’s hard to believe that we’re nearly at the end of another year; the fourth year of operation for Film Sprites PR. It’s been a fun and inspiring year, and we’ve had the great pleasure of working with some truly fabulous filmmakers to provide publicity and digital marketing. Here’s a look back at some of the projects we’ve assisted this year!

Under the Flowers: Circle of Hell

UTF Circle of Hell Promo Poster

Film Sprites PR had the great pleasure of teaming up with Mad Shelley Films again to promote Under the Flowers: Circle of Hell, the second thrilling installment of this chilling female-driven horror webseries. The season received glowing reviews, as well as award nominations and wins at several film festivals. Season 3, Waking the Witch, is now in development.

The Final Blade

Final Blade Poster Resize

In August  we assisted NZ-based Chinese director Willie Ying with the Auckland release of his feature film, The Final Blade. The film was scheduled for an initial 3 days of screenings at Event Cinemas St Lukes, Albany and Queen Street and by the first day of screenings this was extended to an additional 5 days. And despite being screened during NZIFF 2018 (always a difficult time to secure press outside of NZIFF-screened films) we were able to secure media placements (including interviews) in outlets like Radio NZ, Western Leader/Stuff, Showtools, and the NZ Herald’s Time Out magazine supplement.

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Us Among the Stones

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Film Sprites PR assisted with the pre-production crowdfunding campaign for director D.R. Hood’s second feature film, Us Among the Stones a few years ago, and this year we had the great pleasure of assisting with the crowdfunding campaign for post-production funds on Social Screen. Not only did they meet their crowdfunding target, they exceeded it, achieving 113%!

Us Among the Stones stars Laurence Fox (The Frankenstein Chronicles, Inspector Lewis), Raia Haidar, Sinead Matthews (Chewing Gum, Mr Turner, Wreckers) and Anna Calder-Marshall. It is the second feature from D.R. Hood, the writer/director of acclaimed independent film Wreckers, starring Claire Foy (Netflix’s The Crown, Unsane), Benedict Cumberbatch (BBC’s Sherlock, Doctor Strange) and Shaun Evans (Endeavour, Silk).

AFK

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And rounding out the year, we’re currently assisting NZ fantasy/gaming webseries AFK with publicity and digital marketing of their second thrilling season. Filmed in NZ with an entirely Kiwi-based cast, it features actors that have appeared in The Hobbit trilogy, 6 Days, Spartacus: Blood and Sand, Power Rangers, Legend of the Seeker, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, Avatar, The King’s Speech and Mortal Engines. AFK is available to watch at TVNZ On Demand (NZ only), Stareable and YouTube.

Time for that gift!

And yes, as promised…it’s gift time! We’re giving you Getting Prepped for 2019, a handy guide on when to generate publicity and digital marketing for your indie film or webseries. It also includes a timeline you can either print out or modify to help you to plan everything out and have it at your fingertips! You can download this guide HERE.

Many thanks to our clients, supporters, indie film fans, media partners and friends who have made 2018 a really special year indeed. We’re having our summer break from December 22nd- 27th, but you can always contact us to schedule a meeting to discuss your publicity and digital marketing needs in 2019.

 

When a Project Feels Like Coming Home: Us Among the Stones

Us Among the Stones

After assisting on the pre-production crowdfunding campaign for Us Among the Stones (which was then titled This Family), Sprites is back working with writer/director D.R. Hood and the Likely Story team for their post-production crowdfunding campaign, which launches at the end of this week. Returning to the project feels like coming home. Rather fitting, considering the film is centred around a dutiful son (played by Laurence Fox) in thrall of his dying mother (played by Anna Calder-Marshall) who visits his childhood home during one weekend. Recently separated from his partner, he ends up in the middle of his colourful extended family as they descend on the family home.

Us Among the Stones is a film that has been 20 years in the making, sparked by the story of D.R. Hood’s sister’s visit to a big house as an architecture student. This house had an ancient wine cellar, pre-medieval origins and was presided over by a hippy laird. The story would end up being the foundation (no pun intended) for what would become Us Among the Stones as it is today.

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Ungraded still of Owen (Laurence Fox) and Marianne (Anna Calder-Marshall) in Us Among the Stones

You may also be familiar with D.R. Hood’s first film, Wreckers, starring recent Emmy® Award-winner Claire Foy, Emmy® nominee Benedict Cumberbatch, and Shaun Evans. Wreckers won Best Film of the Perspectives Competition at the 2012 Moscow International Film Festival. D.R. Hood was also a nominee for Best British Newcomer at the 2012 London Film Festival and New Voices/New Visions Grand Jury Prize nominee at the 2012 Palm Springs International Film Festival. Us Among The Stones also reunites Hood with Wreckers creative collaborators Annemarie Lean-Vercoe (as DoP), Claire Pringle (as editor) and Wreckers actress Sinead Matthews starring as ‘Anna’.

D.R. Hood says: “my hope for the film is that people feel they can relate to the characters and story even if very different…at the heart the film is about a man who comes home stuck and leaves liberated, and it explores what ties home and family can have for us, even long after we have apparently ‘grown up’. It is also about time- the time we live in, and the deep time we come from, and an uncertain future. What does family mean? Family is not always just the people you are related to.”

Us Among the Stones is taking over the Twitter and Facebook accounts of Likely Story, so be sure to follow them, and use the hashtag #UsAmongTheStones. The crowdfunding campaign is launching very soon.

When’s The Best Time to Grow Your Film’s Audience?

when to grow your film's audience

A few weeks ago I was up in Auckland to catch up with clients and film industry acquaintances. One afternoon, I was chatting with an acquaintance who has been in the film industry here in NZ for many years. We were discussing the best time to grow your audience for your film via publicity and social media. The consensus? Pre-production.

Yes, really! Pre-production is the best time to start to grow your audience. Mainstream releases and tentpole films generally have the benefit of being able to secure coverage and have a built-in audience due to things like the cast, a known director, being part of a franchise, and more. It can be a lot harder for indie films and filmmakers to receive that sort of coverage…but it’s not impossible. It just takes a bit of strategic planning early on in production.

So why start building your audience in pre-production?:

  • You will cultivate a following that wants to support you every step of the way: this can be particularly beneficial if you’re looking to crowdfund during production or in post.
  • Your intended audience will have more awareness of your film on release: imagine having a dedicated following and fan base ready and waiting to see your film and media outlets who are more likely to provide coverage and/or review your film because they’re aware of your film prior to release. That’s powerful stuff!

Audience Preparation Before Release-min

So, how do you go about building your audience in pre-production?

Make sure you have your social media accounts and website established: if you have a production company website and social media accounts already set up and with a large following, you may want to retain that instead of setting up separate accounts, especially if you are building your audience for a short film or have a slate of films in the works. Check out our post on the most frequently asked questions about social media for filmmakers for more hints and tips.

Crowdfunded in pre-production? Capitalize on campaign updates: the great thing about crowdfunding platforms is that they provide you with the opportunity to raise funds for your project, but also help you to build an audience at the same time. The campaign updates function on your campaign page should not be forgotten after your campaign! You can find out about maintaining contributor connection after a crowdfunding campaign here.

Establish a mailing list: invite people to subscribe to your mailing list via your website or a call to action on social media. Provide content like production updates, competitions, and cut-and-paste sample tweets or Facebook posts that can be used by fans when you’re getting ready to launch!

Reward your fans: some of the most passionate, dedicated fans are the ones who follow your entire journey, so why not reward them? Think about having a ‘Fan of the Week’ post on social media, share fan art, have competitions for signed merch, and more. Your imagination is the limit here!

Start building relationships with journalists and media outlets: get to know the journalists and media outlets that you would like to secure coverage from when you’re ready to release your film. Follow them on Twitter and like them on Facebook, interact with them and share content from them that is relevant to your audience. Never underestimate the power of a great connection with media and journalists.

Building your audience in pre-production may sound daunting. After all, you’ve got so much else to juggle! But think of it as an investment in your film that will return to you right when you want it.

Strategies For Reluctant Self-Promoters

strategies for reluctant self-promoters

I can honestly say that I owe about 99% of the opportunities I’ve had in my career to being a smartarse.

And I don’t mean being a smartarse in a disrespectful way, but some of the biggest and most exciting opportunities in my life have arisen because I’ve been cheeky enough to ask for them in a playful way that doesn’t come off as pushy. This isn’t something that would work for everyone, but that’s my schtick. I pretty much live my life on the verge of telling a joke anyway, so using my sense of humour (and my cheekiness!) have become second nature.

It’s something I’ve had to develop over many years, because to be completely honest I’m very much a reluctant self-promoter. Part of it stems from the fact that here in New Zealand we’re not big on tooting our own horn. Part of it is because I’m very much an introvert, and while I can bring the energy for presenting a workshop or networking events, I need at least a day to recover afterwards. Introversion isn’t a hindrance to things like networking and self-promotion, but it needs careful consideration when it comes to utilising your energy resources and being at your best (I’m sure many of you can relate).

In the work that I do, I get to talk to a lot of filmmakers about their work, and I often hear them express the difficulty they have in self-promoting their work. Sometimes there is a reluctance in reaching out to people for donations to their crowdfunding campaigns,  promoting on social media or reaching out to media outlets to secure coverage or a review. It’s something I understand- sometimes it’s not easy! But your work deserves to be seen and appreciated.

Better yet, the information age provides filmmakers with a variety of opportunities to connect with their audiences in ways that were not previously available prior to the Internet going mainstream and the development of social media. The world is literally at your fingertips.

So, how can you grow your audience and promote yourself and your work if you’re really reluctant? I have some strategies that may help- they’re the same ones I have used over the years successfully:

camera strategies for reluctant self promoters

Work out what’s stopping you: chances are, when you think about promoting your work, you’ll have thoughts and/or feelings that arise over it. It’s a good idea to really drill down and find out why you’re reluctant to promote your work. Find 5-10 minutes in your day to sit undisturbed with a pen and paper or your laptop with a word processing document open and ready. Take a few deep breaths, focusing on each breath and clearing your mind. When you’re ready, think about self-promotion of yourself or your work and identify any thoughts or feelings that come up around it. Write them down.

Now that you’ve got your list, look at what you wrote. Here’s where it gets interesting! Step outside of yourself for a minute and imagine that it’s your best friend thinking and feeling these things. For each thought or feeling, write a statement that refutes that thought or feeling. For instance, if this thought came up:

“Nobody gives a damn about independent filmmakers and their films”

You might write:

“Who is this ‘nobody’? There are plenty of people who are passionate about independent filmmakers and their films. You will find those people when you connect with your audience.”

Do this for each thought or feeling. It sounds silly, but it really does work!

Take approaches that you’re comfortable with: perhaps you’re not comfortable with social media, but have someone on your team that is and can provide social media assistance. If you’re more comfortable reaching out to media outlets via e-mail, then that’s completely fine! The same applies when you’re crowdfunding your project: if you’re not comfortable with social media, you may want to approach people individually or via your mailing list.

Authenticity is key: you don’t have to be anyone else. You don’t have to try and put on airs and graces with people. Being yourself and sharing your passion for your filmmaking well and truly resonates with your audience. People are passionate about filmmaking, so let them into your world and your process.

You don’t have to do it all at once: while it’s a good idea to have your social media presence established and also tap into resources for publicity of your filmmaking, you don’t have to do it all at once! If it’s easier for you to start with one thing and then add other strategies later, then do so. After all, good things take time!

Strategies for Reluctant Self-Promoters film sprites pr

Remember your WHY: I say this so often with different scenarios because it’s applicable across the board. If you start to feel really reluctant about promoting your work yourself, remember WHY you started filmmaking in the first place. This helps to not only bring you back to your centre, but it also provides a boost of inspiration to propel you forward through your reluctance.

Happy filmmaking!

Handy Crowdfunding Resources for Indie Filmmakers

Handy Crowdfunding Resources for Indie Filmmakers

I can say with complete sincerity that it’s been a complete blast bringing you our Crowdfunding for Filmmakers month! There’s been lots of great feedback and it’s been thoroughly enjoyable to bring to you hints, tips and advice on crowdfunding of your indie film or webseries. There have been people who have said: “well, what about my (insert non-film project here)?” No problem! All of the hints and tips we’ve provided here are easily adaptable to any campaign for any project- the reason for a filmmaking focus is, well, we work with filmmakers!

This post is going to be a little different from the previous crowdfunding posts, because I wanted to bring you a really useful toolbox of resources that can assist you with your crowdfunding, regardless of budget or size of project. Some of these resources are ones I personally use for the work we do at Film Sprites PR, some are really handy resources that will inspire and add to your crowdfunding resource and knowledge base. Plus, we’ve got a little freebie we’ve been hinting about via our social media as well! So, here’s some resources I hope you’ll find genuinely useful:

TED Talks and Other Must-Sees

I have previously talked about how Amanda Palmer’s TED Talk about ‘The Art of Asking‘ was vital in the creation of Film Sprites PR, and it really is powerful. It’s something I recommend every artist watches at least once before they think about undertaking a crowdfunding campaign. Why? It’s so hard to ask for anything in life because it can be such a vulnerable act, but when you remember the importance of human connection and of being seen it can put asking in a new light. If you’re really amped up after watching this, you can follow it up with Amanda’s Google talk as well. I also thoroughly recommend reading her book of the same name, because the sections about artists and crowdfunding that are interspersed throughout the book will give you insight on the process from an artistic perspective, something which is so very valuable.

Another talk (this time at TEDxJerseyCity), is John T. Trigonis’ talk ‘Crowdfunding Today, Tomorrow, Together‘. John knows his stuff, because he’s not only run his own successful crowdfunding campaigns for his films and graphic novels, he’s also a film strategist for IndieGoGo. I’ve said it many times and I’ll say it again- John knows his stuff. I also highly recommend the second edition of his book ‘Crowdfunding for Filmmakers‘. It’s an enjoyable read with lots of no-nonsense examples and advice, and it’s definitely well worth your time. It’s the one book I recommend to every filmmaker.

And if you’re super-keen, grab a cup of your favourite hot beverage and a notepad and pen and get immersed in Emily Best of Seed & Spark’s videos on crowdfunding for Film Courage.

Posts From Our Vault:

During this month we’ve given you a wealth of information about crowdfunding for filmmakers, but we have also posted blog posts about aspects of crowdfunding in the past as well! We give you ways to look after yourself during your crowdfunding campaign to avoid burnout, how to harness Twitter for your crowdfunding campaign, and how to maintain that ever-important connection with your contributors post-campaign.

Social Media Scheduling Tools:

While you should aim for around a 90/10 ratio for organic posts/automated posts, there are some great scheduling tools which can assist you in scheduling and posting across your social media platforms simultaneously instead of having to do it manually for each platform. Hootsuite is arguably the first platform which comes to mind, but I actually like Tweetdeck when it comes to automation and scheduling on Twitter also.

Design Software and Apps:

Confession: I love design apps, not just for their ability to assist me in designing things quickly and cleanly for social media, but because with many design apps they will help you to crop pictures to fit the proportions of various social media platforms. Images are exceptionally useful when it comes to promoting your crowdfunding campaign on social media and sharing things behind-the-scenes of your film, and design apps can really assist you, even if you have absolutely no clue about how to use design software like Photoshop. Here are the software/apps I particularly like:

  • Canva: I can honestly say that I use Canva almost every day in some capacity because it’s very easy-to-use. One benefit of Canva is that it will give you alignment guidelines so you can make sure everything is aligned and looking good. For every design size there are also templates available with different design mock-ups. The basic (and generously extensive) software is free to use and you don’t have to download it if you’re using it on a home computer.
  • Pixlr: here’s another one I use regularly, and have used often during crowdfunding campaigns and for social media posts. In fact, if you’ve seen social media posts for the 2018 Raindance crowdfunding campaign that we’ve been posting on our Twitter, Instagram and Facebook posts, you might have seen collages which show multiple images (like the picture below). These were created via Pixlr. Pixlr is useful for multi image collages, but it also has things like filters, special effects and photo editing which can be useful for touching up images you want to use. The Pixlr app is particularly useful for editing on the run!
Raindance FF Past Screeners

Image created in Pixlr to show films which had previous screened at Raindance Film Festival, to be posted on Twitter.

  • Another app I like is Promo Republic. One of the benefits of Promo Republic is that it gives you a calendar which shows you when international events are coming up (like awards ceremonies, holidays or quirky national days), and there are often templates to match. This can be useful if you’re looking for content to post which matches the theme or vibe of your film.

And now, as promised…we have a freebie for everyone! Click HERE to gain access to our booklet, Crowdfunding Hints and Tips for Filmmakers. It contains two of our most popular (and most useful!) posts about crowdfunding for filmmakers. There’s no catch- no purchase necessary, no opt-in, just click and download. Simple!

Film Sprites PR Crowdfunding Hints and Tips for Filmmakers

Hopefully this has been a really useful month of posts about crowdfunding for you. If you’d like to know more about what we do at Film Sprites PR in terms of publicity and digital marketing of independent films and webseries, you can find out more HERE. Alternately, get in touch with us! Use our contact page, or drop us an email at: filmspritespr[at]gmail[dot]com.